Humanitarian aid

Argos, a valuable tool for humanitarian aid programs

Argos is a unique worldwide location and data collection system dedicated to studying and protecting the environment.

Because they are dependable and easy-to-use, Argos terminals are used by many humanitarian aid programs to relay crucial information from remote areas.

Prevention tools

The UK registered NGO, the Mentor Initiative, works in cooperation with Argos technology to provide test kits for Malaria. This includes fifty rugged Argos satellite transmitters that are supplied to remote health sites in Angola and Liberia. With continued funding, equipment will be supplied in Kenya, Chad, Congo and areas affected by the tsunami, including the Ache province. The transmitters include a large numeric keypad and icon based display that health workers used to transfer data out disease outbreaks. The data are transferred through Argos and redirected to the WHO and the country Ministry of Health were the outbreak is occurring. Early detection and treatment is critical to preventing epidemics and by using satellite to transmit information, world health organizations can set-up effective aid.

School feeding

The United Nation’s WFP, set up an Argos program to monitor its School Feeding Program. The goal of the School Feeding Program is to improve education by encouraging enrollment and school retention in food insecure areas and vulnerable areas in developing countries. By using an Argos transmitter, an unit especially designed for this project, schools located in remote areas send monthly information via Argos including: number of children enrolled at school, pupils school attendance, number teachers, teachers attendance, the number of school days and days of distribution at school, the different types and quantity of food commodities received at the school and balance of food rations distributed. These important data are immediately available on-line and studied by International Organizations in order to provide the most valuable aid possible and where needed the most.