Argos http://www.argos-system.org Worldwide tracking and environmental monitoring by satellite Tue, 17 Apr 2018 16:03:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://www.argos-system.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/r1023_9_logo-cls_thumbnail.png Argos http://www.argos-system.org 32 32 Argos’ challenges for ActInSpace 2018 http://www.argos-system.org/actinspace-2018/ Tue, 17 Apr 2018 15:36:59 +0000 http://www.argos-system.org/?p=5388 ActInSpace is an innovation contest (Hackathon) initiated by the French Space Agency (CNES) uniting over 60 cities across 5 continents....

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ActInSpace is an innovation contest (Hackathon) initiated by the French Space Agency (CNES) uniting over 60 cities across 5 continents. This international event aims to bring together entrepreneurs, students, developers, creatives…

For 24 hours, teams will work on challenges proposed by various companies, with the support of business and technical experts, to imagine products and services, based on spatial technologies/data, that will be useful in everyone’s life.

The winning teams will be able to participate in the national and international finals and all promising projects can benefit from advice from the partner incubators and thus transform their project into a real company.

Argos is a unique worldwide location and data collection system dedicated to studying and protecting the environment.

By combining the data acquired with their location, Argos enables biologists and scientists around the world to improve their understanding of animal behavior, such as their movements, foraging strategies, reproduction and the way they adapt to their surrounding environment.

 

Two challenges about Argos are proposed by CLS

Wildlife under threat! How can we protect endangered species?

The Argos beacon is a unique satellite-based location and data collection system used for environmental protection. Thanks to this system, animals can be monitored (migrations, habitats, breeding grounds).

This challenge consists to imagine new ways to use Argos beacons to improve wildlife protection. You can use any type of data and environmental reports related to Argos data.

 


New Argos : new challenges!

Since thirty years, thanks to Argos beacons, we were able to locate and collect data for different applications: animal tracking, fishing, oceanography, transportation… Long before Internet of Things, Argos was the Internet of space! Argos’ operation is based on a satellite constellation which collect beacon’s signals and retransmits them to receiving stations with an average revisit time of approximately one hour.

The system is poised to become even more effective with the new Argos project: IoT platform, real time, more data, bidirectional link. This challenge consists to forecast the new potential uses of this tool: connected agriculture, connected transport, fight against environmental crime…

 

 

This article Argos’ challenges for ActInSpace 2018 was first published on Argos.

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Argos satellite system helps track porbeagle sharks http://www.argos-system.org/argos-ptt-tracking-sharks/ Tue, 17 Apr 2018 10:27:54 +0000 http://www.argos-system.org/?p=5334 Porbeagle shark is a wildlife species which migrates long distances. Monitoring their movements is important to help...

This article Argos satellite system helps track porbeagle sharks was first published on Argos.

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Porbeagle shark is a wildlife species which migrates long distances. Monitoring their movements is important to help protect them. Since they are permanently subaquatic, they are located using Argos pop-up satellite archival tags.

The migration of nine porbeagle sharks have been monitored for several months and up to one year by G. Biais of Ifremer, Unité Halieutique Gascogne Sud. During that time, they have covered 5000 to 13000 km, reaching an area about 2000 km from their starting point, in a wide variety of directions – North, South, West. Fished in Europe from the 1930s, the species has declined and is now protected. Knowing its migration is thus useful to develop a greater understanding of porbeagle biology and ecology.

Tracks of the nine tagged porbeagles (Credits Ifremer)

 

Porbeagle sharks (Lamna nasus) have no need of surfacing to breath, feed or anything. The usual way of retrieving a migratory animal location for wildlife tracking is when the  Argos PTT is out of the water, since the signal does not transmit well across a thick layer of water. When animals are always subaquatic, specific beacons, “pop-up satellite archival tags” have been developed to locate them. They register information including light, temperature, pressure, while the tracked animal is moving and up to a pre-programmed time when the tag detaches itself from the animal. Knowing the light intensity and orientation, the temperature of the water and the depth, a location can be estimated. When the tag detaches and thus surfaces, the data are retrieved using Argos satellites wherever this occurs in the oceans. CLS Argos is then processing them to fine-tune the track with the “track & loc” service.

 


Useful links & references

© Image :  Return to sea of a tagged porbeagle (photo G. Biais, Ifremer)

French article about the nine tagged porbeagle sharks, Le Marin

Biais Gerard, Coupeau Yann, Seret Bernard, Calmettes Beatriz, Lopez Remy, Hetherington Stuart, Righton David (2017). Return migration patterns of porbeagle shark ( Lamna nasus ) in the Northeast Atlantic: implications for stock range and structure . Ices Journal Of Marine Science , 74(5), 1268-1276

This article Argos satellite system helps track porbeagle sharks was first published on Argos.

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Contribution of space technologies for livestock and food security http://www.argos-system.org/contribution-space-technologies-breeding-food-security/ Tue, 10 Apr 2018 12:20:13 +0000 http://www.argos-system.org/?p=5242 As part of the ESA program named ARTES 20/Integrated Applications Promotion (IAP), and with the support of...

This article Contribution of space technologies for livestock and food security was first published on Argos.

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As part of the ESA program named ARTES 20/Integrated Applications Promotion (IAP), and with the support of the CNES, CLS is working on a new space application for animal tracking in the field of livestock management, disease reduction and sustainability of ecosystem services. This system is called SISMA as an acronym standing for « Space Innovative System to Monitor Animals ». 

This first service is an efficient monitoring solution of reindeers’ activities and their vulnerability factors, with the aim to limit losses and support sustainable management of herds in Russia.

The SISMA service for reindeers in Russia targets three user communities:

  1. Herders and Natural reserves for connecting reindeers to herders to reduce animal loss and increase the number of animals managed (or save time for other activities).
  2. Health communities for building the capacity of veterinary services over the territory to reduce detection delays of diseases and support decision making and to control of operational costs.
  3. State agencies (Agricultural, Environmental) & participating scientists for knowledge of ground occupation by the herds to adapt management strategies to climate change and also to secure critical reindeer habitats and food supply, reduce reindeer fragmentation/land conflicts, set up conditions for economic development of reindeer husbandries (e.g. for subsidies, meat exportation) and develop sustainable hunting of wild reindeers.
 

Useful links:

SISMA project

© image: Institute of Biological Problems of Cryolitozone of Russian Academy of Sciences

Wildlife Monitoring by Argos

This article Contribution of space technologies for livestock and food security was first published on Argos.

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ARGOS news on Facebook http://www.argos-system.org/argos-news-facebook/ Thu, 05 Apr 2018 10:36:23 +0000 http://www.argos-system.org/?p=5227 We invite you to visit our Facebook page to not miss any news related to ARGOS. We...

This article ARGOS news on Facebook was first published on Argos.

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We invite you to visit our Facebook page to not miss any news related to ARGOS.

We frequently post news, and other contents related to our activities.

Click on the image to access our page

 

 

 

This article ARGOS news on Facebook was first published on Argos.

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Lilia Dmitrieva, Caspian seal ecology and conservation http://www.argos-system.org/lilia-dmitrieva-caspian-seal-ecology-conservation/ Sun, 25 Mar 2018 15:24:31 +0000 http://www.argos-system.org/?p=5092 The Caspian seal (Pusa caspica) is a small-bodied, ice-breeding phocid, endemic to the landlocked Caspian Sea in...

This article Lilia Dmitrieva, Caspian seal ecology and conservation was first published on Argos.

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The Caspian seal (Pusa caspica) is a small-bodied, ice-breeding phocid, endemic to the landlocked Caspian Sea in Central Asia. The species is listed as ‘Endangered’ by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), having declined by around 90% from a population exceeding 1 million individuals at the start of the 20th century, primarily due to unsustainable hunting. It is now subject to a range of threats including high levels of mortality from fishing by-catch and other anthropogenic sources, and habitat loss and disturbance caused by industrial and urban development. Little was known about its’ movement and dive patterns, until a group of scientists from Estonia, Kazakhstan, Russia and the UK deployed 75 Argos satellite tags on Caspian seals from 2009 to 2012. Their results, originally published in the Marine Ecology Progress Series, “Individual variation in seasonal movements and foraging strategies of a land-locked, ice-breeding pinniped,” provide valuable data to support conservation efforts in the region, as this adaptation of their article points out.

 

A Caspian seal about to be released after tagging with a Wildlife Computers SPOT tag.


 

Lilia Dmitrieva

This work was conducted by an international team of European, Russian and Kazakh researchers, (Caspian International Seal Survey (CISS)), who have been interested in Caspian seal ecology and conservation since 2004. The lead author of the paper is Dr. Lilia Dmitrieva, a post-doctoral research fellow in marine mammal ecology at the University of Leeds, UK, working with the programme leader Dr. Simon Goodman. Dr. Goodman’s research spans marine mammal ecology, conservation biology, and population genetics, and he is a member of IUCN Pinniped Specialist Group. The team would like to thank Agip KCO and NCOC for financial support under the North Caspian Sea Production Sharing Agreement

(NCSPSA) Venture, which made the work possible.

 


 

From left to right, Kobey Karamendin, Mart Jussi, Lilia Dmitrieva, Simon Goodman, Timur Baimukanov, Yermukhammet Kassymbekov.

Example tracks for Caspian seals tagged in April 2011 showing some of the variation in migration patterns observed. Left seals which made long distance movements into the mid and southern Caspian, right seals which remained in the northern Caspian for the whole deployment period April 2011-April 2012

 


  

Crucial data for conservation

Intensive human activity throughout the Caspian, including fishing, oil and gas extraction, shipping and coastal development overlap with the seal movements identified here. A seal ‘migration corridor’ along the Kazakh coast connecting the north-east and mid-Caspian overlaps with intensive shipping and fishing activity. Areas used by seals along the western coast also overlap with commercial fishing grounds. The north Caspian, which is an important year round habitat used for moulting, transit, foraging, resting and breeding, is an area of intensive oil and gas development and also has high levels of sturgeon poaching activity which generates substantial bycatch of seals (Dmitrieva et al. 2013). In view of these environmental pressures, Argos telemetry data can help assess impacts from human activities and contribute to conservation measures such as defining protected area which encompass critical habitats for Caspian seals.

 

This article Lilia Dmitrieva, Caspian seal ecology and conservation was first published on Argos.

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The lynxes of Jura http://www.argos-system.org/the-lynxes-of-jura/ Sun, 18 Mar 2018 14:49:32 +0000 http://www.argos-system.org/?p=5166 A video recently posted on Facebook by Jean-Marie Thévenard, shows the passage of three lynxes, a female...

This article The lynxes of Jura was first published on Argos.

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A video recently posted on Facebook by Jean-Marie Thévenard, shows the passage of three lynxes, a female and her two cubs, in a snowy Jura forest.

The Argos beacon from CLS is used by the Athénas wild animal care center. Thus Gilles Moyne, the director of the center, reminds us Fario, a Jura lynx, who was followed thanks to Argos allowing him to protect this young specimen after a rescue.
 

“It is ‘just’ a female and two young lynxes close to emancipation, an image not so rare that in the Jura context, but always pleasant to see. Remember that about 120 adult lynx constitute the French population, that a little more than 80% are in the Jurassian Massif, and that every year, road collisions and poaching make part of them disappear, to such an extent that the population has stagnated for 5 years. Fortunately, some, like this little family, thwart the pitfalls and meet the discreet and benevolent photographers.” 


 

The Athénas care centre, headed by Gilles Moyne, is expected to equip raptors with Argos beacons. These raptors (about 60!) belonged to a zoo whose treatment quality was considered unsatisfactory… Gilles Moyne and his teams are currently harboring these biodiversity refugees while waiting to release some of them.

We will keep you informed of the wanderings of those who will be equipped with Argos beacons!

 

Useful links:

Article on actu.fr

This article The lynxes of Jura was first published on Argos.

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Capture and study of marine turtles in Martinique http://www.argos-system.org/study-marine-turtles-martinique/ Wed, 14 Mar 2018 10:57:28 +0000 http://www.argos-system.org/?p=5024 Martinique hosts key areas defined as development habitats for green and hawksbill turtles. In this context, the...

This article Capture and study of marine turtles in Martinique was first published on Argos.

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Martinique hosts key areas defined as development habitats for green and hawksbill turtles. In this context, the local wildlife management and conservation structures and the National Action Plans recommend to study the importance of these feeding sites for sea turtles, in order to determine the dynamics of the populations and the identify the threats to them.

Conducted in partnership with the local institutions concerned, this project is part of the National Action Plan for the Protection of Marine Turtles in Martinique (coordinated by DEAL Martinique (Direction of the Environment, Planning and Housing of Martinique) and the ONF (Office National Des Forets). This project will allow the study of the evolution of sea turtle numbers in feeding areas, the study of turtle feeding areas nesting in Martinique by satellite tracking, the production of a synthesis of data on the range of turtles feeding in the French West Indies, and a study on fidelity to feeding sites by individual identification.

The project was initiated in 2010 by DEAL Martinique and the ONCFS (National Office for Hunting and Wildlife). To do this, turtles are caught on different sites such as the Preacher or St. Peter. They are then studied, by measurements and sampling, including by marking (via banding or beacons), 2 ARGOS SPOT 352A and 375 An tags have been deployed on green turtles to allow their tracking via the ARGOS satellite system.

It is not less than 101 turtles that were captured including 97 green turtles and 4 hawksbill turtles.

 

This article Capture and study of marine turtles in Martinique was first published on Argos.

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Eric Stéphan and Alexandra Rohr, Learning more about basking sharks with argos http://www.argos-system.org/eric-stephan-alexandra-rohr-basking-sharks-argos/ Fri, 16 Mar 2018 10:06:53 +0000 http://www.argos-system.org/?p=5077 Understanding and monitoring marine species is crucial for the development of coherent and effective management practices. That...

This article Eric Stéphan and Alexandra Rohr, Learning more about basking sharks with argos was first published on Argos.

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Understanding and monitoring marine species is crucial for the development of coherent and effective management practices. That is why the French Agency for Marine Protected Areas, now part of the French Agency for Biodiversity, quickly realized the advantages of satellite-tracking marine species in collaboration with scientists. The studies conducted by APECS (a French Association dedicated to the study and conservation of elasmobranchs) on basking sharks highlight the great potential of Argos transmitters. Indeed, for the moment little is known about the habitat of these “giants of the sea” apart from in certain coastal areas. In this article, Eric Stéphan, the Coordinator of APECS, and project manager Alexandra Rohr, share the initial results of their studies conducted in collaboration with the French Agency for Biodiversity.

 


 

 

Argos satellite tracking tags by Wildlife Computers that can be attached to basking sharks. The MK-10 archival tags (below) record data underwater for several months before releasing and rising to the surface to transmit data. The towed SPOT tags (above) transmit data whenever the animal rises to the surface

 

 

 

 


 

Eric Stéphan APECS Coordinator

Since 2002, Eric has worked on several projects at APECS (the French Association for the protection of selachians). His work initially involved studying basking sharks, notably through the EcoBask and “Sur les traces du requin pèlerin” (Tracking basking sharks) projects. More recently, he conducted studies on rays in coastal waters as part of the RECOAM  program. Since 2015, he has continued working as a scientific project manager on certain projects, notably the Pelargos project, but also devotes part of his time to the coordination of APECS’ various projects.

 


 

Alexandra Rohr Project Manager

Alexandra has a Master’s degree in Oceanography and Marine Environments. She was recruited by APECS in 2014 to carry out a bibliographic review of the benefits of spatio-temporal management measures for protecting elasmobranchs. In 2015, she joined the association’s team once again to coordinate citizen science program initiated by APECS. She has been working on the Pelargos project since 2017.

 


This French research and educational NGO is dedicated to sharks, skates and rays. It works to enhance the scientific knowledge not only by collecting data with Argos but also via citizen science programs or surveys at sea


Anna’s trajectory between May 2016 and May 2017. Anna is a female basking shark who measures 6.5 meters long.

MK-10 deployment on a basking shark with a tagging pole.

PELARGOS PROJECT PARTNERS

This article Eric Stéphan and Alexandra Rohr, Learning more about basking sharks with argos was first published on Argos.

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Keith Reid, Penguins show the way for marine spatial planning http://www.argos-system.org/keith-reid-penguins-show-way-marine-spatial-planning/ Mon, 12 Mar 2018 09:37:03 +0000 http://www.argos-system.org/?p=5052 The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) is responsible for the ecosystem-based management...

This article Keith Reid, Penguins show the way for marine spatial planning was first published on Argos.

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The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) is responsible for the ecosystem-based management of fisheries in the Southern Ocean. The ‘ecosystem approach‘ means that the effects of commercial fishing must take into account not only harvested species (target species) but also dependent species, such as marine predators for which target species are essential to their diet. For Antarctic krill, a central component to the Antarctic marine ecosystem, dependent species include seals and penguins. So the ‘ecosystem approach‘ requires not only monitoring and estimating the krill intake of fishermen  but also that of marine predators  and understanding the spatial interactions between fishing vessels and penguins is key. Enter an innovative program that combines Vessel Monitoring System (VMS) data from fishing vessels with Argos tracks from penguins, as Keith Reid of CCAMLR explains.

 


 CCAMLR creates world’s largest Marine Protected Area

In October 2016, a joint USA/New Zealand proposal to establish a 1.55 million km2 marine protected area (MPA) in the Ross Sea with special protection from human activities was approved by the Commission for the Conservation of Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). This new MPA will be effective as of December 2017. The establishment of this protected area strikes a delicate balance between marine protection, sustainable fishing and scientific interests. The area includes important habitats and foraging areas for marine mammals, birds, fish, and invertebrates, including some the region’s most enigmatic species, such as Weddell seals, killer whales and Emperor penguins. Within the protected area is a ‘no-take’ zone, representing 72% of the total area, where all fishing is forbidden. Other areas will allow for some harvesting of fish and krill for scientific research. The MPAs implementation involves a specific monitoring and assessment plan that is currently being developed.


Keith Reid

Dr Keith Reid is the Science Manager at the Secretariat of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). Prior to his appointment to CCAMLR he was a research scientist with the British Antarctic Survey from 1991 – 2007, he was Project Leader of the Ocean Ecosystems and Management program and completed a secondment as a polar science and policy advisor to the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office. He gained a PhD from Liverpool University in 2002 and has successfully supervised three PhD students and numerous Masters and Honors students. He is an author of over 70 peer-reviewed publications and 2 books. His work focuses on the use of science in the conservation of Antarctic ecosystems and on developing an effective interface between science and policy.

 


Penguin tracks showing the winter dispersion away from the Antarctic Peninsula,including the location of the Ross Sea region MPA and the South Orkney Southern Shelf MPA

 

Useful links:

MPAtlas 

 

This article Keith Reid, Penguins show the way for marine spatial planning was first published on Argos.

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Visit us at Oceanology International 2018 http://www.argos-system.org/visit-us-oi2018/ Thu, 08 Mar 2018 09:31:52 +0000 http://www.argos-system.org/?p=5115 Tired of Big Ben, Buckingham Palace and Tower Bridge ? Get a breeze of fresh air at...

This article Visit us at Oceanology International 2018 was first published on Argos.

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Tired of Big Ben, Buckingham Palace and Tower Bridge ?

Get a breeze of fresh air at CLS booth (E300), at the OI2018, the best way to enjoy London next week!

Our team of experts will be happy to see you and answer your question on telemetry services during all the exhibition in London.

 

Oceanology international

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contact: telemetry@cls.fr

This article Visit us at Oceanology International 2018 was first published on Argos.

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