Argos http://www.argos-system.org Worldwide tracking and environmental monitoring by satellite Thu, 19 Jul 2018 09:00:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://www.argos-system.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/r1023_9_logo-cls_thumbnail.png Argos http://www.argos-system.org 32 32 News about the Rana turtle http://www.argos-system.org/news-rana-turtle/ Thu, 19 Jul 2018 08:57:00 +0000 http://www.argos-system.org/?p=5904 Do you remember Rana? This is the turtle collected and treated for four years by the Oceanographic...

This article News about the Rana turtle was first published on Argos.

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Do you remember Rana? This is the turtle collected and treated for four years by the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco. After his release and the few adventures to find the camera that filmed his first 24h of freedom, Rana has already traveled more than 300km. The Caouanne turtle has passed Port-Cros, the Calanques, Fos sur Mer … As of July 17, 2018, she is off Leucate, she runs along the coast, probably to find food and continues on her way to west … how far will it go?

The Oceanographic Institute of Monaco publishes its course on this website. So you can follow the journey of this turtle Caouanne over the days!

 

RANA A DEJA PARCOURU PLUS DE 300 KM ! La jeune tortue Caouanne a passé Port-Cros, les Calanques et est actuellement aux abords de Fos sur Mer. Elle longe la côte, sans doute pour trouver de la nourriture et continue sa route vers l’ouest… jusqu’où ira-t-elle ? Pour le savoir, suivez sa progression grâce à sa balise : http://www.institut-ocean.org/suivi/ (Images du début de son périple > extraites de la caméra fixée à sa carapace pendant 24h)

Publiée par Musée océanographique de Monaco sur Mardi 10 juillet 2018

 

Useful links:

© photo : Oceanographic Museum of Monaco

Oceanographic Museum of Monaco

The adventure of the turtle named Rana and her camera

This article News about the Rana turtle was first published on Argos.

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Scolopax rusticola without frontiers http://www.argos-system.org/scolopax-rusticola/ Mon, 09 Jul 2018 09:40:12 +0000 http://www.argos-system.org/?p=5768 The Eurasian woodcock, Scolopax rusticola, is a very special bird as it is crepuscular. During the day,...

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The Eurasian woodcock, Scolopax rusticola, is a very special bird as it is crepuscular. During the day, it rests in places where there is not much light.  Thus, this species was not very well known before the first tracking – in 2006, as before that the lightest Argos PPT was 18 g, twice too heavy for a bird around 300 to 350 g.

Questions were numerous: What is(are) the real path(s) of Eurasian woodcocks? How long are they flying from the beginning up to their arrival locations? How fast are they flying? Are the Ural Mountains really their destination?…

 
Track of an Eurasian woodcock (credit Joseba Felix Tobar-Arbulu)
Track of an Eurasian woodcock (credit Joseba Felix Tobar-Arbulu)

From 2004 onwards, Argos PPTs were made weighing 12 g and soon less (the smallest one is currently 2 g), with solar panels to give them power. This has enabled the tracking of birds as small as the Eurasian woodcock, to the greatest satisfaction and pleasure of people interested by this species, who designed a special harness to attach the Argos PTT to the bird.  With the financial help of different institutions (Government of Navarre, of Catalonia, of Bizkaia, of Majorca, … some banks), of the Argos team, plus many people (hunters, field people, …) who helped to locate the birds in many different places around the whole Spanish state, from Galicia to Catalonia, from Andalusia to the Basque Country, so much more of this bird’s behavior is now known.

And as usual, when some of those questions were solved by the tracking, new questions came with the first results, and the study went on, and was also made in other countries — Russia, Scotland, Italy, England, and even the USA for another species, the Scolopax minor.

References:

Joseba Felix Tobar-Arbulu (PhD in Engineering, Prof. of the University of the Basque Country)

(Members of the CCB team: Miguel Minondo, Felipe Diez, Zarbo Ibarrola, Izaskun Ajuriagerra, Rubén Ibáñez, Ibon Telletxea and Joseba Felix Tobar-Arbulu)

This article Scolopax rusticola without frontiers was first published on Argos.

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The adventure of the turtle named Rana and her camera http://www.argos-system.org/camera-turtle-rana/ Tue, 03 Jul 2018 10:50:42 +0000 http://www.argos-system.org/?p=5832 Around the 21st of June, as part of an action led by the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco,...

This article The adventure of the turtle named Rana and her camera was first published on Argos.

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Around the 21st of June, as part of an action led by the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco, Robert Calcagno, Damien Chevalier & Olivier Brunel released a sea turtle named Rana who had been receiving treatment for four years. To monitor its evolution an animal tracking system was set up and a camera was placed on Rana. This camera was supposed to detach after 24 hours was lost for a few hours, then the time to launch a search notice on social networks (including the Facebook page of the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco).

Thanks to the rapid dissemination of this information, we know that the camera drifted and was recovered by Fabien Vachee from the company Osmose Nautique who brought him home for safety. Thus the scientists were able to recover this camera containing data that will give a lot of information about the first hours of the Rana turtle in its new environment, and also data on its diving behavior.

After these little adventures, the turtle goes well and continues her way: “Rana is well and swims fast, we follow her thanks to her GPS beacon, she was seen yesterday in Antibes, she is swimming this Thursday morning off the Lerins Islands. “, welcome the teams of the Oceanographic Museum.

 

 

 

Useful links:

© photo : Oceanographic Museum of Monaco

Oceanographic Museum of Monaco

Press article on Rana and its camera – Nice Matin

Museum Research Notice

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Eels become slightly less slippery thanks to Argos & goniometer http://www.argos-system.org/eels-argos-goniometer/ Wed, 27 Jun 2018 08:12:19 +0000 http://www.argos-system.org/?p=5786 Eels are still nowadays a very mysterious fish species. To better know their swimming behaviour when leaving...

This article Eels become slightly less slippery thanks to Argos & goniometer was first published on Argos.

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Eels are still nowadays a very mysterious fish species. To better know their swimming behaviour when leaving the European coasts, accelerometers are used in conjunction with Argos pop-up tags to estimate speed variations during vertical migrations and infer energy expense of eels leaving Europe to reproduce in the Sargasso Sea.

The population of European eel (Anguilla anguilla) have dropped dramatically around the 1980s, without one single reason clearly pinpointed, but a number of possible ones at different stages of their life are examined. Young eels (glass eels) arrive in numbers on the European coasts, including in the numerous Mediterranean lagoons (e.g. Salses-Leucate) from the Sargasso Sea, where they are born. They remain in these coastal areas or go up to fresh water habitats such as rivers for several years, until they metamorphose into silver eels. Then, they change their color and become black on the back, white on the belly. In productive habitats such as lagoons, males (generally under 45-cm long) are 3 years old in average and females (generally over 45-cm long) are older, 5 years old in average (but may reach up to 50 years, as far as we know in less productive habitats). In Autumn, between November and January, these future parents leave the Mediterranean to reproduce in the Sargasso Sea, where they die afterwards.

An international team composed of scientists from the laboratory CEFREM at University of Perpignan, France (Elsa Amilhat, Gaël Simon and Elisabeth Faliex), the DTU in Denmark (Kim Aarestrup), the CEFAS in UK (David Righton) and the SLU in Sweden (Hakan Westerberg) tagged silver eels in autumn 2017 to better understand their swimming behavior at sea. This project was financed by the French Ministry of Agriculture and Food and was conceivable thanks to the tags provided by the CEFAS and the DTU, the collaboration of the scientists from the 4 research institutes cited above and the professional fishermen of the Occitanie Region. Because it is very difficult to follow them once they migrate in the Sea, little is known on their behaviour during this specific period of their life cycle. However, understanding their behaviour on their way back to their reproduction site is a crucial question as the future generation will depend of the success of migration and reproduction of the ultimate silver stage.

Four silver eels leaving Salses-Leucate lagoon, and capture by professional fishermen, were tagged with accelerometers G6 hybrids from CEFAS attached to a pop-up Argos Tag from mrPAT from Wildlife Computer. This system was especially conceived for this study as there is no accelerometer equipped with pop up and geolocalisation system for the moment. The accelerometer needs to be retrieve at sea in order to get the data inside. The accelerometers measure acceleration in 3 dimensions, temperature and depth. The function of the mrPAT was essentially only to get location data for the retrieval. Unfortunately, it is not possible to determine the trajectory of an eel under water since eels swim too deep to allow geolocation from daylight measurements. The procedure is to let the accelerometer and pop-up tag measure during six days (enough time for the eel to reach the deep water under 200 m and starts vertical dial migrations), and detached (programmed released) close enough to the coasts to go and retrieve the instruments with its data stored before the battery of the mrPAT ends after 2 days.  The campaign was led with fishermen on their trawling boat. To retrieve the accelerometers, the Argos pop-ups emit when at the water surface. They are then positioned with a goniometer, used to triangulate the position when rounding the emission source on the fishing boats. With that protocol, 3 of the 4 accelerometers were located (the last one was out of range of the boat) and 2 were retrieved (both in less than 20 min!), and their data are being analyzed now at the CEFAS

 
 

An eel with the accelerometer and pop-up tag
An eel with the accelerometer and pop-up tag
The goniometer antenna on top of trawl
The goniometer antenna on top of trawl
the captain looking at the goniometer
The captain looking at the goniometer
 

the pop-up on surface, located using the goniometer, ready to be retrieved
The pop-up on surface, located using the goniometer, ready to be retrieved  ( Credits G. Simon, Perpignan University)

The purpose of using the accelerometers in the experiment was to shed new light on eel swimming behavior: do they swim at the same rate all day? Is there a difference between ascents and descents?  The data are still not fully analyzed. The amount of data is very large, with 3 acceleration measurements 25 times per second during many days. We find the typical diving patterns seen in all eels followed by telemetry.

A short segment of the diving behavior of an eel: a 20 minutes sample of a depth profile, with 10 seconds blowups of the accelerometer data during descent and ascent (grey boxes on depth profile). The x and y component of acceleration show the heave and sway of the eel and the z component is along the length axis of the eel, where the gravitational acceleration is added or subtracted depending on the attitude of the eel.

A short segment of the diving behavior of an eel: a 20 minutes sample of a depth profile, with 10 seconds blowups of the accelerometer data during descent and ascent (grey boxes on depth profile). The x and y component of acceleration show the heave and sway of the eel and the z component is along the length axis of the eel, where the gravitational acceleration is added or subtracted depending on the attitude of the eel.

A short segment of the diving behavior of an eel: a 20 minutes sample of a depth profile, with 10 seconds blowups of the accelerometer data during descent and ascent (grey boxes on depth profile). The x and y component of acceleration show the heave and sway of the eel and the z component is along the length axis of the eel, where the gravitational acceleration is added or subtracted depending on the attitude of the eel.(Credits CEFREM, Perpignan University)

 

Useful links:

CEFREM : Elsa Amilhat elsa.amilhat@univ-perp.fr/ Gael Simon gsimon@univ-perp.fr/Elisabeth Faliex faliex@univ-perp.fr

DTU : Kim Aarestrup kaa@aqua.dtu.dk

CEFAS: David Righton (Cefas) <david.righton@cefas.co.uk>

SLU : Håkan Westerberg <hakan.westerberg@slu.se>

Goniometer

Photo: An eel in the sea with a pop-up tag. Credits G. Simon, Perpignan University

This article Eels become slightly less slippery thanks to Argos & goniometer was first published on Argos.

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Elephant seals diving for science http://www.argos-system.org/elephant-seals-diving/ Mon, 11 Jun 2018 13:17:32 +0000 http://www.argos-system.org/?p=5560 The marine animals living in the open ocean, and especially in the Southern Ocean, are among the...

This article Elephant seals diving for science was first published on Argos.

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The marine animals living in the open ocean, and especially in the Southern Ocean, are among the ones which knowledge benefitted the most from Argos wildlife tracking. We discovered a lot about Southern Elephant seals, among those – depths of dive, paths followed, etc., all things completely unknown previously and about their environment and the way it affects their behaviour. Tracking continues, for a better knowledge of the seals, and also since they are irreplaceable divers to places we need to measure more often.

Animation of the tracks of the elephant seals equipped by IMOS early 2018 (credits Xavier Hoener, IMOS)

Southern Elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) are living around Antarctica (a different species lives in the North Pacific), breeding on the islands there like Kerguelen or Macquarie Island. Before the advent of Argos PTTs and of the clever sensors measuring things like temperature, pressure etc., nobody had the slightest idea that those animals are among the recordcreatures of different disciplines: they dive at about 1500 m (the deepest dives can be down past 2000 m) while holding their breath for 30 min (the longest known breath hold is 120 min); they are also making long trips horizontally – maybe not the 20,000 leagues of the novel, but more than 6000 km in less than six months, swimming and diving all the way.

Elephant seal with an Argos tag (photo C. Guinet CNRS/CEBC)

Elephant seals from Kerguelen search their food in two main foraging areas: in the subAntarctic and Antarctic waters. Females forage most of the time far in the open ocean, while subadult and adult males search their food over the Kerguelen and the Antarctic plateaus.

artist view of an elephant seal by the youngest (5-6 years old), projected while presenting the species during the Argonautica annual meeting
Artist view of an elephant seal by the youngest (5-6 years old), projected while presenting the species during the Argonautica annual meeting

Their travels and the spread of their tracks (from -10° to 100°E this year – for two different individuals), as well as their frequent and deep dives gave the idea to marine biologists to use that species to collect oceanographic data while studying their at-sea ecology. Temperature and salinity data are added to physical oceanographic databases in conjunction with the Argo floats. So they are complementing the Argo float array, in areas where not so many instruments are launched in particular South of 60 degrees South, a region especially important for regulating global climate, where there are almost no hydrographic observations

Some of those elephant seals, either from Clive McMahon (IMOS, Australia) or from Christophe Guinet (CEBC, France)’s teams were followed this year (and previous years) within the French Space Agency educational project Argonautica (description of this project here, the maps and tracks in both English and French).

 

References

Photo featured : Elephant seal with an Argos tag (photo C. McMahon, IMOS/U. Sydney)

This article Elephant seals diving for science was first published on Argos.

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Siberian Arctic fox on the move http://www.argos-system.org/siberian-arctic-fox/ Tue, 29 May 2018 07:54:38 +0000 http://www.argos-system.org/?p=5440 Nowadays Arctic wildlife is often endangered by climate changes and human activities, and they are not always...

This article Siberian Arctic fox on the move was first published on Argos.

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Nowadays Arctic wildlife is often endangered by climate changes and human activities, and they are not always very well known. The arctic fox is a small animal, white in Winter, living around the Arctic circle. In Siberia it has been little studied for now, but miniaturization progresses make it possible to track it by satellite using Argos, with some surprises with respect to the distances it can cross.

The Artic fox with its Argos tag (credits A. Sokolov)
The Artic fox with its Argos tag (credits A.Sokolov)

The arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) is found in the regions around North pole, either in America or Eurasia, Greenland and Iceland. As some other of the fauna of the area, the species is threatened in some territories (like Scandinavia). Because of climate change, the tundra is shrinking; and red fox is appearing from the boreal zone, and tend to dominate on arctic fox.

The artic foxes in Siberia have been scarcely studied, and their movements are mostly unknown. Studies in Canada have shown that about ten percent of the population moves long ways, but the question in open in Siberia. There, they might have a seasonality in their movements (Southwards at Fall, Northwards at Spring), but the scale and regularity of such movements still have to be proven. Thus the idea of using satellite wildlife tracking technologies to follow their movements, especially since small Argos PTTs are now available (the weight of a beacon must not be over 3% of the animal’s).

 

 

Tracks of the arctic fox from Vortuka and back, with distances and speeds. Note that when it crosses “water” it is in fact iced. (Credits IEC “Arctic”)

Track of the arctic fox marked at long-term monitoring site Erkuta, around Polar Ural and back, across the Yamal peninsula to Gydan peninsula, with distances and speeds. Note that when it crosses “water” it is in fact iced at this time of the year. (Credits A.Sokolov)

 

On March, 28, 2017 an arctic fox was trapped by the local hunter Takuchi Laptander. Together with the research team of Arctic Research Station of Institute of Plant and Animal Ecology (Ural Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences) leaded by Dr. Aleksandr Sokolov, the animal was equipped with a satellite collar (Argos PTT from Es-Pas Ltd) at the Erkuta long-term monitoring site (68.2°N; 68.9°E), Southern Yamal, Russia. After release, the fox had stayed close from where it was trapped for 12 days. Then it performed several longer trips: it moved West over the Baidaratskaya Bay and around Polar Ural for a trip of about 300 km where it had stayed for 10 days in close vicinity of several populated localities. Then, it returned to the vicinity of the capture location and later moved East, over the Obskaya Bay and North to Gydan Peninsula. Overall the probably non-breeding arctic fox travelled extensively both over land and sea ice, covering at least 1000 km (700 km in a period of 30 days), before the signals stopped on the 25th of July.

 

References

Aleksandr Sokolov, Natalya Sokolova, Dorothee Ehrich, Ivan Fufachev, Vasiliy Sokolov and Takuchi Laptander. 2017. Long-distance movements of the first Siberian Arctic Fox equipped with satellite collar // 5th International Arctic Fox Conference (Université du Québec à, Rimouski, Canada, 12-15 October 2017): Progr. and Abst. – P. 75.

This pilot study was supported by RFBR-Yamal grant No. 16-44-890108. Collar was produced by “Es-Pas” Ltd. (Moscow). Price of the collars and satellite data were covered by IEC “Arctic” of Yamal government.

This article Siberian Arctic fox on the move was first published on Argos.

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Tweeting Mediterranean Loggerhead turtles as oceanographers http://www.argos-system.org/tweeting-loggerhead-turtles/ Tue, 15 May 2018 10:10:26 +0000 http://www.argos-system.org/?p=5423 Loggerhead turtle around Balearic Islands are equipped with Argos satellite tracking tags. Their data are used as...

This article Tweeting Mediterranean Loggerhead turtles as oceanographers was first published on Argos.

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Loggerhead turtle around Balearic Islands are equipped with Argos satellite tracking tags. Their data are used as oceanographic data source, and they also can be followed in real-time on Twitter, as a mean of raising awareness on the threats to this wildlife species and the way of helping protecting them.

Argos tracking map of two turtles (Source SOCIB)

Argos tracking map of two turtles (Source SOCIB)

 

The loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) is one of the seven species of marine turtle worldwide, and the most common species found around Spain, Canary Islands and Balearic Islands. Around Balearic Islands, they are mostly coming from a Northwest Atlantic nesting population, meaning they were born on some beaches of the east coast of the USA or Caribbean island, and had passively migrated with the current with sargassum, driftwood etc., and ending up on the other side of the Atlantic, and then entering the Mediterranean. Around the Canary Islands and the Balearic Islands these turtles find an extraordinary foraging habitat to which they contribute forming a small “oasis” of biomass aggregation in the middle of the open ocean “Serengeti”. However, as everywhere in the ocean, the loggerhead turtles are threatened by fishing nets, plastic (especially plastic bags) and other pollution; their back can be damaged by collision with a boat, etc., thus the need to implement such a wildlife tracking.

Turtle oceanographers

The “Oceanographic Turtles” project aims to provide the scientific basis to support the development of risk mitigation techniques based on new ocean observing and forecasting systems and contribute to the conservation of marine turtles. The project addresses the role of operational ecology in the dynamic ocean management using the loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) in the western Mediterranean Sea as case study.

Oceanographic Turtles project. Animal-borne sensors collect information about sea temperature and send the information throughout the Argos System. Source: SOCIB.

Oceanographic Turtles project. Animal-borne sensors collect information about sea temperature and send the information throughout the Argos System. Source: SOCIB.

 

When an Argos PTT satellite transmitter is deployed, turtles become “oceanographers of opportunity”. Every time the turtles surface to breath or bask, their tag transmits a signal via satellite to CLS/Argos center then SOCIB, with information on where they are, how deep they are diving, and what temperatures there are at different depths. They also provide with a mean of calibrating the oceanographic readings of gliders, buoys and satellites with the response at a biological level in open ocean ecosystems.

Tweeting turtles. Users can follow the turtles on its own twitter account, follow their track in a web map and chat with them to ask about their status. Source: SOCIB.

Tweeting turtles. Users can follow the turtles on its own twitter account, follow their track in a web map and chat with them to ask about their status. Source: SOCIB.

 

Tweeting turtles, part of the Oceanographic Turtles project, is a new application developed by the Balearic Islands Coastal Observing and Forecasting System (SOCIB) to provide an innovative public-inclusive mode of science and foster emotional connections to the marine biodiversity. This new system aims to enhance ocean literacy and raise awareness for ocean conservation using real-time animal tracking data and social networks. Followers of the twitter account @TortugaLasi can now follow in real-time the journey of a loggerhead turtle equipped with an Argos satellite transmitter.

Tweeting Turtles combines state-of-the-art methods from satellite tracking, operational oceanography and machine learning. The application is composed of three main parts: i) a twitter website, which serves as main gateway to the system, ii) a web-map viewer, that displays the trajectory of the turtle together with oceanographic maps, and iii) an intelligent chatbot to assist general public for learning facts about the tracked turtle.

Ocenographic Turtles is a project funded by BBVA Foundation and developed by Balearic Islands Coastal Observing and Forecasting System, Alnitak, the Mediterranean Institute for Advanced Studies, Palma Aquarium Foundation, and the Service of Species Protection from the Balearic Islands Government.

 

Useful links:

Website SOCIB

“Oceanographic Turtles” Project website 

Youtube video (Spanish)

Twitter: @TortugaLasi

This article Tweeting Mediterranean Loggerhead turtles as oceanographers was first published on Argos.

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EO4 wildlife – Platform for wildlife monitoring integrating Copernicus and Argos data http://www.argos-system.org/eo4-wildlife/ Fri, 04 May 2018 07:55:13 +0000 http://www.argos-system.org/?p=5491 In November 2017, a new version of the EO4wildlife platform was released to all partners. This version...

This article EO4 wildlife – Platform for wildlife monitoring integrating Copernicus and Argos data was first published on Argos.

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In November 2017, a new version of the EO4wildlife platform was released to all partners. This version provide a wide new set of features such as access to new datasets, integration of new processing services, improvements on platform usability and on interoperability issues…

On topic of metocean data, the ambition of EO4wildlife is to grant scientists easy access to tens of earth observation datasets, thus dealing with terabytes of data by using a system of local cache instead of hosting all the data to the platform.

Integrating smoothly the EO4wildlife platform into the existing ecosystems of animal monitoring applications is another key element for scientists. EO4wildlife was designed to complement existing systems (like Seabird or Seaturtle platforms for instance).

To learn more about the new EO4 wildlife platform, please read the newletter (link below).



Useful link:

EO4 wildlife Newsletter January 2018

 

 


Argos’ challenges for ActInSpace 2018:

ActInspace wildlifeActInSpace New Argos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This article EO4 wildlife – Platform for wildlife monitoring integrating Copernicus and Argos data was first published on Argos.

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How do lesser spotted eagles learn their migration routes? http://www.argos-system.org/spotted-eagles-migration/ Wed, 02 May 2018 08:08:17 +0000 http://www.argos-system.org/?p=5407 Argos wildlife tracking helps to understand the best conditions for young lesser spotted eagles to survive their...

This article How do lesser spotted eagles learn their migration routes? was first published on Argos.

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Argos wildlife tracking helps to understand the best conditions for young lesser spotted eagles to survive their first migration. Using solar-powered tags, over 100 birds of different birth location and age have been followed since 2004 during their trip to Africa, to monitor the effects of translocating young birds to another region for conservation purposes.

The lesser spotted eagles (Clanga pomarina) is a declining species in Germany, which migrates to Africa in Autumn. To help stabilize the population some newly hatched second birds (Abels) which normally do not survive in their nest are translocated from other European countries, reared in captivity and released. However, what are the consequences of this translocation for their migration?

Tracks of lesser spotted eagles during their migrations in 2009, depending on their maturity and birth place. Juveniles born in Latvia and translocated to Germany mostly do not follow the same route than the others, probably because they do not follow experienced adults (credits Prof. Dr. Bernd-U. Meyburg)

Tracks of lesser spotted eagles during their migrations in 2009, depending on their maturity and birth place. Juveniles born in Latvia and translocated to Germany mostly do not follow the same route than the others, probably because they do not follow experienced adults (credits Prof. Dr. Bernd-U. Meyburg)

 

Argos wildlife tracking helps to understand the best conditions for young and adult lesser spotted eagles to survive their 10,000-km long migrations. Using Argos PTTs, over 100 birds have been followed since 1992. Between 2004 and 2016, 85 second-hatched juveniles were reared in captivity for release into the declining German population, including 50 birds that were translocated 940 km from Latvia.
To monitor the effects of translocating young birds to another region for conservation purposes, in 2009 twelve translocated juveniles, as well as eight native juveniles and nine native adults were tracked to determine how inexperienced birds come to use strategic migration routes.
Up to the beginning of the operation “Saving Abels” over ten years ago the number of pairs declined by one third and is now stable. However, the reproduction of the wild population is still declining so that more fledglings are needed more than ever. In 2017 the number of young Abels released originating from eastern Poland was as big as that of the wild pairs. Some years ago a male from Latvia even started breeding successfully few kilometers from the release station while others were also discovered in nearby Western Poland were the population is also small. It is therefore hoped that additional Abels will help the population in eastern Germany and western Poland which is separated from the rest of the breeding range by a large corridor.


References

Meyburg, B.-U.,  U. Bergmanis, T. Langgemach, K. Graszynski, A. Hinz, I. Börner,  C. Meyburg & W. M. G. Vansteelant 1917. Orientation of native versus translocated juvenile lesser spotted eagles (Clanga pomarina) on the first autumn migration. Journal of Experimental Biology 220: 2765-2776 (doi:10.1242/jeb.148932)

Photo courtesy Carsten Rohde, 2012

This article How do lesser spotted eagles learn their migration routes? was first published on Argos.

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Argos’ challenges for ActInSpace 2018 http://www.argos-system.org/actinspace-2018/ Tue, 17 Apr 2018 15:36:59 +0000 http://www.argos-system.org/?p=5388 ActInSpace is an innovation contest (Hackathon) initiated by the French Space Agency (CNES) uniting over 60 cities across 5 continents....

This article Argos’ challenges for ActInSpace 2018 was first published on Argos.

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ActInSpace is an innovation contest (Hackathon) initiated by the French Space Agency (CNES) uniting over 60 cities across 5 continents. This international event aims to bring together entrepreneurs, students, developers, creatives…

For 24 hours, teams will work on challenges proposed by various companies, with the support of business and technical experts, to imagine products and services, based on spatial technologies/data, that will be useful in everyone’s life.

The winning teams will be able to participate in the national and international finals and all promising projects can benefit from advice from the partner incubators and thus transform their project into a real company.

Argos is a unique worldwide location and data collection system dedicated to studying and protecting the environment.

By combining the data acquired with their location, Argos enables biologists and scientists around the world to improve their understanding of animal behavior, such as their movements, foraging strategies, reproduction and the way they adapt to their surrounding environment.

 

Two challenges about Argos are proposed by CLS

ActInspace wildlife

The Argos beacon is a unique satellite-based location and data collection system used for environmental protection. Thanks to this system, animals can be monitored (migrations, habitats, breeding grounds).

This challenge consists to imagine new ways to use Argos beacons to improve wildlife protection. You can use any type of data and environmental reports related to Argos data.

 


ActInSpace New Argos

Since thirty years, thanks to Argos beacons, we were able to locate and collect data for different applications: animal tracking, fishing, oceanography, transportation… Long before Internet of Things, Argos was the Internet of space! Argos’ operation is based on a satellite constellation which collect beacon’s signals and retransmits them to receiving stations with an average revisit time of approximately one hour.

The system is poised to become even more effective with the new Argos project: IoT platform, real time, more data, bidirectional link. This challenge consists to forecast the new potential uses of this tool: connected agriculture, connected transport, fight against environmental crime…

 

Discover Argos Forum with examples of animal tracking

This article Argos’ challenges for ActInSpace 2018 was first published on Argos.

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